Snowbeast Steps Nosferatu Duel

Check out the last four awesome edits for this year 🙂

 

Snowbeast

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Enjoy LauraH’s 5 minute edit of Snowbeast at 90to5 or on youtube 😀

Snowbeast is a 1977 American made-for-television horror film starring Bo Svenson, Yvette Mimieux, Robert Logan and Clint Walker which premiered on NBC on April 28, 1977. The film was shot at Crested Butte Mountain Resort in Gunnison County, Colorado.
The movie details the attacks of a ravenous creature (a Yeti or Bigfoot/Sasquatch) on a Colorado ski resort. The teleplay was written by Joseph Stefano, who wrote the script for Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 thriller Psycho. Stefano reportedly used a book by Roger Patterson (who claimed to have encountered a Sasquatch in 1967) as his primary inspiration, though no credit is given.
Snowbeast was directed by Herb Wallerstein, a veteran of many television shows such as I Dream of Jeannie, Star Trek, The Brady Bunch and The Six Million Dollar Man. Editors on the original movie were Dennis Mosher, Carroll Sax and Neil Travis.
 

Nosferatu

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Enjoy Charlie Hall’s 5 minute edit of Nosferatu at 90to5 or on youtube 😀

Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens (translated as Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror; or simply Nosferatu) is a 1922 German Expressionist horror film, directed by F. W. Murnau, starring Max Schreck as the vampire Count Orlok. The film, shot in 1921 and released in 1922, was an unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, with names and other details changed because the studio could not obtain the rights to the novel: for instance, “vampire” became “Nosferatu” and “Count Dracula” became “Count Orlok”.
Stoker’s heirs sued over the adaptation, and a court ruling ordered that all copies of the film be destroyed. However, a few prints of Nosferatu survived, and the film came to be regarded as an influential masterpiece of cinema. As of 2015, it is Rotten Tomatoes’ second best-reviewed horror film of all time.
The film was released in the United States on 3 June 1929, seven years after its original premiere in Germany, where it instantly became a hit.
 

The 39 Steps

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Enjoy Isabelle Levent’s 5 minute edit of The 39 Steps at 90to5 or on youtube 😀

The 39 Steps is a 1935 British thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock, starring Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll. Very loosely based on the 1915 adventure novel The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan, the film is about an everyman civilian in London, Richard Hannay, who becomes caught up in preventing an organization of spies called the 39 Steps from stealing British military secrets. After being mistakenly accused of the murder of a counter-espionage agent, Hannay goes on the run to Scotland with an attractive woman in the hopes of stopping the spy ring and clearing his name. It was voted the best British film of 1935.
Editor on the original movie was Derek N. Twist.
 

Duel

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Enjoy Jeff Didlick’s 5 minute edit of Duel at 90to5 or on youtube 😀

Duel is a 1971 television (and later full-length theatrical) thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg in his full-length film directing debut and written by Richard Matheson, based on Matheson’s short story of the same name. It stars Dennis Weaver as a terrified motorist stalked on a remote and lonely road by the mostly unseen driver of a mysterious tanker truck. The script is adapted by Richard Matheson from his own short story, originally published in Playboy magazine. It was inspired by a real-life experience in which Matheson was tailgated by a trucker while on his way home from a golfing match with friend Jerry Sohl on November 22, 1963, the same day as the John F. Kennedy assassination. The short story was given to Spielberg by his secretary, who reportedly read the magazine for the stories.
Duel was Spielberg’s second feature-length directing effort, after his 1971 The Name of the Game NBC television series episode “L.A. 2017”. Duel received many positive reviews and is often considered one of the greatest TV movies ever made. Editor on the original movie was Frank Morriss.